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Visualizing Hurricanes

Visualizing Hurricanes
Information graphics demystify Earth’s most powerful storms
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/sa-visual/visualizing-hurricanes/
Hurricane Hot Towers
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU0Y7qjoacA
Published on Nov 25, 2012

This visualization won Honorable Mention in the National Science Foundation's Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge in September 2007. It was also shown during the SIGGRAPH 2008 Computer Animation Festival in Los Angeles, CA. 'Towers in the Tempest' is a 4.5 minute narrated animation that explains recent scientific insights into how hurricanes intensify. This intensification can be caused by a phenomenon called a 'hot tower'.
Tropical cyclones on track to grow more intense as temperatures rise
Aerosols have compensated for greenhouse gases, but won't in future
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714151858.htm
July 14, 2016
Source: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University

Summary: Powerful tropical cyclones like the super typhoon that lashed Taiwan with 150-mile-per-hour winds last week and then flooded parts of China are expected to become even stronger as the planet warms. That trend hasn't become evident yet, but it will, scientists say.

Over the past century, tiny airborne particles called aerosols, which cool the climate by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, largely cancelled out the effects of planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions when it came to tropical storm intensity, according to a new scientific review paper published this week in the journal Science. That might sound like a good thing, but many of those particles came from the burning of fossil fuels and wood, and contributed to acid rain, smog and lung damage. As vehicles and power plants added filters and scrubbers to reduce their impact on human health, levels of human-made aerosols in the atmosphere began to decline. At the same time, greenhouse gas concentrations continued to rise.


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